Learn about the benefits of ISTURISA

Model shown is not an actual patient.

ISTURISA (is tur ee’ sah) is a prescription medicine used to treat adult patients with Cushing’s disease who1:

  • Can’t have pituitary surgery, or
  • Have had pituitary surgery but were not cured of their Cushing’s disease

Your Cushing’s disease symptoms are caused by too much cortisol

Cushing’s disease is the result of chronic exposure to the hormone cortisol (sometimes called the “stress hormone”). Cortisol is produced in the adrenal glands, located on top of your kidneys.2-4

The right balance of cortisol is needed to help control important body functions, such as keeping blood sugar and blood pressure levels stable, among others.2

Too much cortisol can lead to obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, muscle weakness, excess hair growth, an increased risk of bruising, depression, and even osteoporosis.3

Weight Gain
Weight gain
Diabetes
Diabetes
Depression
Depression

How Isturisa Can Help

ISTURISA helps bring cortisol levels back to normal1

In a clinical study, ISTURISA was proven to lower cortisol levels1

2/3 of patients on ISTURISA had normal cortisol levels after 48 weeks1

3x as many patients had a complete response* to ISTURISA compared to placebo1

*A complete response was defined as patients who had normal cortisol levels after week 34, and who neither discontinued taking ISTURISA nor increased their dose after week 26.1

Additional benefits of ISTURISA include:

  • Dosing that can be individualized to your specific needs1
  • Tablets that can be taken with or without food1
  • Dedicated nurse, pharmacist, and insurance specialist patient support through the R.A.R.E. program

Wondering if ISTURISA is right for you?

Download the ISTURISA Informational Brochure

ISTURISA® (osilodrostat) Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

ISTURISA (osilodrostat) is used to treat adults with Cushing’s disease who cannot have pituitary surgery, or who have had pituitary surgery, but the surgery did not cure their Cushing’s disease.

Important Safety Information:

  • Hypocortisolism: Treatment with ISTURISA may cause symptoms associated with low levels of cortisol in your blood (hypocortisolism). Tell your healthcare provider right away if you experience more than one of the following symptoms, as these may be symptoms of very low cortisol level, known as adrenal insufficiency: nausea, vomiting, tiredness (fatigue), low blood pressure, stomach (abdominal) pain, loss of appetite, dizziness. If you get symptoms of hypocortisolism while taking ISTURISA, your healthcare provider may change your dose or ask you to stop taking it.

ISTURISA® (osilodrostat) Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

ISTURISA (osilodrostat) is used to treat adults with Cushing’s disease who cannot have pituitary surgery, or who have had pituitary surgery, but the surgery did not cure their Cushing’s disease.

Important Safety Information:

  • Hypocortisolism: Treatment with ISTURISA may cause symptoms associated with low levels of cortisol in your blood (hypocortisolism). Tell your healthcare provider right away if you experience more than one of the following symptoms, as these may be symptoms of very low cortisol level, known as adrenal insufficiency: nausea, vomiting, tiredness (fatigue), low blood pressure, stomach (abdominal) pain, loss of appetite, dizziness. If you get symptoms of hypocortisolism while taking ISTURISA, your healthcare provider may change your dose or ask you to stop taking it.
  • Heart Problem or Heart Rhythm Problem: ISTURISA may cause an irregular heartbeat which could be a sign of a heart problem called QT prolongation. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have irregular heartbeats.
  • Increase in Other Adrenal Hormone Levels: Your other adrenal hormones may increase when you take ISTURISA. Your healthcare provider may monitor you for the symptoms associated with these hormonal changes while you are taking ISTURISA such as low potassium (hypokalemia), high blood pressure (hypertension), swelling (edema) in the legs, ankles, or other signs of fluid retention, excessive facial or body hair growth (hirsutism), acne (in women). Call your healthcare provider if you have any of these side effects.
  • Most common side effects include very low cortisol levels (adrenal insufficiency), tiredness (fatigue), nausea, headache, swelling of the legs, ankles or other signs of fluid retention (edema). These are not all of the possible side effects of ISTURISA.

To report SUSPECTED SIDE EFFECTS, contact Recordati Rare Diseases Inc. at 1-888-575-8344, or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Before taking ISTURISA, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have or had heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat, including a condition called prolonged QT syndrome (QT internal prolongation). Your healthcare provider will check the electrical signal of your heart (called an electrocardiogram) before you start taking ISTURISA, 1 week after starting ISTURISA, and as needed after that.
  • have a history of low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood.
  • have liver problems.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if ISTURISA passes into your breast milk. You should not breastfeed if you take ISTURISA and for 1 week after stopping treatment.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription medicines, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take medicines used to treat certain heart problems. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure whether your medicine is used to treat heart problems.

Please see the accompanying Full Prescribing Information, including the Medication Guide, for ISTURISA and talk with your healthcare provider.

References: 1. ISTURISA® (osilodrostat) [full prescribing information]. Lebanon, NJ: Recordati; March 2020. 2. Endocrine Society. Cortisol. Hormone Health Network. https://www.hormone.org/your-health-and-hormones/glands-and-hormones-a-to-z/hormones/ cortisol. Updated November 2018. Accessed April 29, 2020. 3. Pivonello R, De Martino MC, De Leo M, Simeoli C, Colao A. Cushing’s disease: the burden of illness. Endocrine. 2017;56(1):10-18. 4. National Institutes of Health. US National Library of Medicine. Adrenal Gland Disorders. https://medlineplus.gov/adrenalglanddisorders.html. Updated January 23, 2020. Accessed April 29, 2020.